Compare the journey of Mrs. Moore to India with Marlow’s Journey

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 Compare the journey of Mrs. Moore to India with Marlow's journey to Congo
 Compare the journey of Mrs. Moore to India with Marlow's journey to Congo

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Compare the journey of Mrs. Moore to India with Marlow’s Journey to Congo.

 

Ans. Mrs. Moore’s journey to India and Marlow’s journey to
Congo involves their experiences in colonial countries under different
imperial rules. The purposes of their journeys are different and their
experiences are also of different kinds. Mrs. Moore is a kindly, pious,
old English lady who comes to India for no other purpose initially
than to act as an escort for Miss Adela Quested who is to marry her
son, Ronny Heaslop, the city Magistrate at Chandrapore. However,
later on she becomes interested in the Indians, and like Miss, Quested
is anxious to see the “real India”. Marlow’s purpose is to see the
imperial exploitation of a backward country like Congo by a civilized
nation.

We first see Mrs. Moore when she enters the mosque and is
accosted by Dr. Aziz. Soon an understanding grows between them.
Finding her sympathetic Aziz complains in strong words about the ill-treatment of his boss, Major Callender, and his equally callous wife.
However, Aziz emotionally calls her an “Oriental” and a friendship
was established between Aziz, a Moslem, and Mrs. Moore, an English
woman. Later on, we see that Mrs. Moore is distressed by the
behavior of her community towards the Indians, and is on occasions
critical of its strange inhumanity.

In India Mrs. Moore senses a unifying love, uniting all creatures
of heaven and earth. Thus while going to hang up her dress one night,
before retiring for sleep, she notices a wasp sleeping on the peg. Her
heart goes out to the weak wasp which is sleeping peacefully,
unaware of any danger. Her sympathy with and acceptance of even a
wasp makes her an Oriental in another sense. It links her in a mystic
way with Prof Godbole and his Hindu philosophy—which sees the
noblest and the lowest of creatures united in a spirit of divine love.

Mrs. Moore to has a similar belief: “God is love”, as she explains to
“God has put us on earth to love our neighbors and to show it’
and He is omnipresent even in India, to see how we are succeeding.
Yet in the process of closer to the Hindu ways of feeling;
something disastrous happens to her in the Marabar Caves.
The Anglo Indians act as a herd, united in their vicious contempt and
hatred for the native Indians, whom they despise as belonging to
an inferior race.Thus both Heart of Darkness and A Passage to India deal with
the theme of the evil of colonialism or imperialism most successfully.

 

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